Monthly Archives: December 2016

Fis-edsolutions ltd – bbc reports – Thousands of smaller schools ‘financially not viable’

Thousands of smaller primaries and secondaries in England are becoming financially unviable, heads say.

The Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL) says one-form entry primaries and secondaries with 600 pupils or fewer will “fall off a cliff” financially unless new funds are found.

The government says it has been protecting school budgets.

Independent experts say they face real-terms cuts of 8% to cover cost rises in pension, pay and national insurance.

The Institute of Fiscal Studies says having been insulated from real-terms cuts over the last Parliament, schools are likely to feel the pinch more over the current Parliament, with spending per pupil set to fall.

‘Big issue’

A one-form entry primary has about 210 pupils, 65 fewer than the average-sized primary school.

Some 20% of primaries (3,478) in England have fewer than 200 pupils, and 30% (5,037) have fewer than 300 pupils.

The average-sized 11-to-16 secondary has about 970 pupils, while a three-form secondary has about 450 pupils and a four-form primary has about 600.

Malcolm Trobe, interim general secretary of the ASCL, told the BBC: “At some smaller schools, the funding will become such that they would not be able to support their teaching infrastructure.

“They will not be financially viable.

“One-form entry primary schools, and three- to four-form entry secondary schools, are going to find it extremely difficult, especially in low-funded education authorities.

“This size of school is quite common, and they are under real threat.

“They are going to find it extremely difficult to provide a full curriculum and maintain the support staff infrastructure needed to run the school.

“It’s all down to the cost pressures that have come home to roost – the unfunded pay rises, national insurance costs and pension contributions.”

‘Historic unfairness’

He said with continuing delays to the publication of the long-awaited new national funding formula for England’s schools, due now to be introduced in 2018, were really struggling.

 

Fis-edsolutions ltd -BBC Report – Reports states Thousands of smaller primaries and secondary’s in England are becoming financially unviable, heads say.

The Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL) says one-form entry primaries and secondaries with 600 pupils or fewer will “fall off a cliff” financially unless new funds are found.

The government says it has been protecting school budgets.

Independent experts say they face real-terms cuts of 8% to cover cost rises in pension, pay and national insurance.

The Institute of Fiscal Studies says having been insulated from real-terms cuts over the last Parliament, schools are likely to feel the pinch more over the current Parliament, with spending per pupil set to fall.

A one-form entry primary has about 210 pupils, 65 fewer than the average-sized primary school.

Some 20% of primaries (3,478) in England have fewer than 200 pupils, and 30% (5,037) have fewer than 300 pupils.

The average-sized 11-to-16 secondary has about 970 pupils, while a three-form secondary has about 450 pupils and a four-form primary has about 600.

Fis-edsolutions ltd : Report states Rural schools set for funding boost under new Government proposal

Some schools are set for a boost in funding as the Government proposes to change rules to ensure that institutions in remote areas have enough money to stay open.

Education Secretary Justine Greening unveiled proposals on Wednesday to end an “unfair, opaque and outdated” funding system that favoured children in London over those in the countryside.

Under the biggest reforms to school funding in a decade, a new national formula will use a host of factors to calculate how much money is allocated to each school, including “sparsity”, which takes into account how small and remote it is.

Ms Greening told the Commons: “We’ll protect those small rural schools which are so important to their local communities by inclusion of a sparsity factor.

“What we can’t accept is other areas in other parts of the country that have similar challenges in relation to deprivation and lower prior attainment, not being funded, for no other reason than that they’re not London. It’s now time to have a fair approach.”

Under the proposed changes, primary schools which qualify for sparsity funding would receive up to £25,000, which rises to £65,000 for secondary, middle and all-through schools. Overall, an extra £27 million would be spent on the sparsity factor.

The Education Secretary also promised extra money to schools with a high population of “mobile” students, meaning children who join mid-way through the academic year.

Fis-edsolutions ltd – BBC Report- Academy schools breach transparency rules

Nineteen academy schools are to be investigated for “flouting” rules on transparency following a BBC investigation.

The schools have not published a register of all their governors’ interests, against official rules.

Education campaigners say there is “a culture of secrecy” around some academies.

The Department for Education (DfE) said the “rules were clear” and it would investigate.

BBC England’s data unit selected 100 academies across England at random and found 19 of them had not either published a current register of interests for governors on their school or trust websites, or had only given the interests of directors and members.

Academies in numbers

5,758

Academies in England

28%

Of all state-funded schools

3,430 primary academies

2,068 secondary academies

260 special and alternative provision

1,004 school in the pipeline to become academies

Source: DFE as of 1 October 2016

 

Fis-edsolutions ltd reports Newspaper report- :Southeast primary schools do best in Sats tests

More than half of England’s best state primaries are in London and the southeast of England — and many are church schools, according to the latest Sunday Times rankings, published today.

Of the top 500 schools in the Parent Power rankings, 136 are in London and 120 in the southeast, making up 51.2% of the total.

Six of the best 10 schools are in London and the rankings are headed by Fox primary in Kensington, once attended by the Strictly Come Dancing judge and former ballerina Darcey Bussell.

By contrast, northwest primaries account for 76 of the top 500 (15.2%), followed by 41 in the West Midlands, 35 in the southwest, 27 in Yorkshire, 23 in the northeast and 22 in East Anglia. The region…