Monthly Archives: September 2015

Fis-edsolutions ltd reports Local Gov -Cost of academy conversion leaves councils in millions of debt

Councils have been left in millions of pounds of debt from converting schools into academies, according to research conducted by the BBC.

The BBC investigation revealed that local authorities are forced to use their education grant to clear the debts created, which the Local Government Association say is taking vital cash from schools not involved in the scheme. This is because when council-maintained schools choose to become academies, local authorities must pay the costs of conversion, including the cost of any deficit and legal fees.

The BBC revealed £32.5m has been spent by councils on clearing debts since the Academies Act was introduced in 2010.

David Simmonds, deputy chairman of the Local Government Association, told the BBC: ‘It is not fair that some schools are burdened with a deficit while other schools can walk away and leave that debt behind at the detriment of other schools in the community.

‘It is not right that the taxpayer foots the bill. This money could instead be spent in ways which directly benefits pupils.’

A Department for Education spokesperson said: ‘Councils are only required to cover a school’s deficit when it has become a sponsored academy after a prolonged period of underperformance, and the deficit was accumulated under council control.

‘Academies are a vital part of our plan for education and are transforming the education for millions of pupils across the country.’

fis-edsolutions ltd bloggs report that Free school lunches for infants could be scrapped, as ministers seek to cut costs as part of the spending review.

Free school lunches for infants could be scrapped, as ministers seek to cut costs as part of the spending review.

Nick Clegg’s flagship policy is under review despite a pledge in the Conservative manifesto to retain it, Sky News reported.

There has been growing speculation in recent weeks that the scheme could be ended as the Department for Education looks to make savings as part of the Chancellor’s spending review.

About £40 billion of the department’s £54 billion budget is ring-fenced, leaving ministers to find savings from other areas that are not safeguarded – including Universal Infant Free School Meals, which costs about £600 million a year.

The Government has also put extra cash into start-up costs of the scheme and reports have suggested the costs of the policy are increasing.

Fis-edsolutions ltd reports on BBC release that Heads push over school funding disparities

Huge regional disparities in funding could leave schools without teachers unless they receive some extra money, say head teachers.

Funding can vary by as much as £3,000 per pupil but the government has pledged to even things out.

The Association of School and College Leaders is urging ministers to “grasp the nettle” on fairer school funding.

The Department for Education has said it increased the budgets of the 69 least fairly-funded areas for 2015-16.

Historically, more money has been channelled towards areas that have high levels of social need, with cash targeted towards those in the inner cities and areas of deprivation.

‘Sailing the Titanic’

Heads argue the disparity between higher and lower funded areas has been magnified by the pupil premium – money targeted at children from poor backgrounds – with £1,320 per child at primary level and £935 in secondary schools.

Additionally, schools are facing increasing pressures on their budgets because of the rising costs of pensions, national insurance contributions and teachers’ pay over the coming years.

Malcolm Trobe, deputy general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, told the Times Educational Supplement that England’s worst funded schools were “not going to be able to afford to put teachers in front of classes” without additional money.

He adds: “It is essential that fairer funding proposals are brought forward as soon as possible. This issue has gone unresolved for too long and previous governments have failed to grasp the nettle.

“The complexity of introducing a fairer funding formula and the need to phase in the new arrangements mean it must be dealt with early in the Parliament. The opportunity to resolve this issue must not be allowed to slip away once again.

“A new formula should establish a sufficient base level of funding per pupil, with additional funding to reflect disadvantage which incorporates the existing pupil premium.

“To be clear. We are not calling for the end to the pupil premium. Our approach is to have a single deprivation funding stream rather than the two that currently exist – one of which is the pupil premium – as this would lead to a fairer distribution of the funds.”

 

fis-edsolutions ltd outlines From time to time and at the start of each academic year, Peter Lauener, Chief Executive and accounting officer of the Education Funding Agency (EFA), writes to accounting officers of academy trusts about financial management, accountability and governance.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/letter-to-academy-trust-accounting-officers-september-2015?utm_source=EFA%20e-bulletin&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=e-bulletin&mxmroi=2305-30488-31144-0

From time to time and at the start of each academic year, Peter Lauener, Chief Executive and accounting officer of the Education Funding Agency (EFA), writes to accounting officers of academy trusts about financial management, accountability and governance.

Fis-edsolutions ltd updates on How much PE and sport premium funding primary schools receive in the academic year 2015 to 2016, and advice on how to spend it.

Funding for the PE and sport premium

Schools receive PE and sport premium funding based on the number of pupils in years 1 to 6.

In cases where schools don’t follow year groups (for example, in some special schools), pupils aged 5 to 10 attract the funding.

In most cases, we determine how many pupils in your school attract the funding using data from the January 2015 school census.

If you are a new school or a school teaching eligible pupils for the first time in the academic year 2015 to 2016, we will base your funding on the autumn 2015 school census.

Payment dates

Maintained schools, including PRUs and general hospitals

Maintained schools, including PRUs and general hospitals, do not receive funding directly from DfE. We give the funding to your local authority and they pass it on to you.

We give local authorities PE and sport premium funding for local-authority-maintained schools in 2 separate payments. Local authorities receive:

7/12 of your funding allocation on 31 October 2015

5/12 of your funding allocation on 30 April 2016

If you are a new maintained school or if you are teaching eligible pupils for the first time in the academic year 2015 to 2016, local authorities receive:

7/12 of your funding allocation on 31 January 2016

5/12 of your funding allocation on 30 April 2016

Academies, free schools and CTCs

The Education Funding Agency (EFA) sends academies, free schools and CTCs their PE and sport premium funding in 2 separate payments. You receive:

7/12 of your funding allocation on 3 November 2015

5/12 of your funding allocation on 1 May 2016

If you are a new academy, free school or CTC, or if you are teaching eligible pupils for the first time in the academic year 2015 to 2016, you receive:

7/12 of your total funding allocation on 1 February 2016

5/12 of your total funding allocation on 1 May 2016

fis-edsolutions ltd- reports on article that outlines financial irregularity in Academies The Observer claims that two allegations of “financial irregularity” at academies and free schools are being made each month, with 58 in the past three years and seven in the first quarter of the 2015-16 financial year. The government’s Education Funding Agency received 11 claims over the matter in 2012-13, 21 in 2013-14 and 19 in 2014-15. Of the 58 allegations, six involved free schools.

The Observer claims that two allegations of “financial irregularity” at academies and free schools are being made each month, with 58 in the past three years and seven in the first quarter of the 2015-16 financial year. The government’s Education Funding Agency received 11 claims over the matter in 2012-13, 21 in 2013-14 and 19 in 2014-15. Of the 58 allegations, six involved free schools.

Fis-edsolutions ltd -Free school meal plan could go?

The government is believed to be considering scrapping the free school meals programme introduced by Nick Clegg in a move that would save the DfE £600m a year. The scheme, which was designed to ensure all primary school children received free lunches in their first three years of education, has been criticised as it has seen examples of schools dipping into core education budgets to subsidise it

Fis-edsolutions ltd reports -Cameron reveals latest free schools to make the grade

The first batch of new free schools approved under David Cameron’s majority government will be announced today in the first step towards fulfilling a Conservative manifesto pledge to create 500 such schools.

The prime minister will give the go-ahead to 18 more free schools to open in the next two years and invite bids for a new round of applications to be considered in the autumn.