Monthly Archives: February 2014

Annal Nayyar -Increasing the number of academies and free schools to create a better and more diverse school system

The DfE today published

There is an urgent need to reform our school system to prevent the standard of education in the UK from falling further behind that of other countries. Our education system is also frequently unequal, with poor performance concentrated in disadvantaged areas.

There is evidence that giving heads and teachers greater freedom over their curriculum, budget and staff can help improve the quality of the education they provide and reduce the attainment gap. We also believe giving parents, teachers and charities the ability to open schools in response to the needs of the local community will help to raise standards.

Actions

To create a more autonomous and diverse school system that offers parents choice and concentrates on improving standards, we are taking the following actions.

Academies

We are:

  • continuing to encourage primary and secondary schools to become academies
  • encouraging strong academies to work with weaker schools to raise standards
  • matching under-performing schools to the sponsors with the strongest track record in raising standards

Free schools, university technical colleges and studio schools

We are:

Background

Academies

In July 2010, we introduced legislation to make it possible for all schools to become academies, including primary and special schools. Becoming an academy gives schools more control over their curriculum, budget and staffing.

In June 2012, we published the ‘Academies report’ for the 2010 to 2011 academic year. It provides an analysis of academies’ educational performance for that year, along with detail on number, type and location of academies across the country and evidence on why school autonomy leads to improved results.

On 12 June 2013, we published the ‘Academies annual report: academic year 2011 to 2012’. The report outlines the performance of academies during the 2011 to 2012 academic year and includes information on how academies use freedoms and flexibilities to raise standards in their schools.

Free schools

In June 2010, Education Secretary Michael Gove invited proposals from groups interested in setting up free schools.

Free schools are all-ability state-funded schools set up in response to what local people say they want and need in order to improve education for children in their community. They are academies by law and so are not under the control of their local authority. To date, the department has supported the opening of 80 free schools across England, 24 in September 2011, 55 in September 2012 and 1 in January 2013.

UTCs and studio schools

In 2011, the Education Secretary went on to invite proposals from groups interested in establishing UTCs and studio schools. UTCs and studio schools are academies for 14- to 19-year-olds. They are backed by employers who help tailor the curriculum to make sure young people are equipped with the skills that will prepare them for the world of work.

Bills and legislation

The Education Act 2011 and the Academies Act 2010 provide the legislation about academies, free schools, UTCs and studio schools

 

Annal Nayyar Schemes for financing schools

Local authorities are required to publish schemes for financing schools setting out the financial relationship between them and the schools they maintain. In making any changes to their schemes, local authorities must consult all schools in their area and receive the approval of the members of their schools forum representing maintained schools.

Annal Nayyar Funding allocation pack: 2014 to 2015 academic year

This guide explains each element that makes up an academy’s funding allocation for the 2014 to 2015 academic year.

It includes examples and explanations to help academies understand how the EFA generates and calculates an allocation.

It sets out:

•where we obtain the data from

•how it is applied to an academy’s individual circumstances

•where they can look for further information about their allocation.

•changes that have been agreed and applied to the AY 2014 to 2015 funding factors

Annal Nayyar- Umberalla Trust v MAT

Umbrella Trust

Each academy  has its own trust, but all the schools in the UT can share governance and procurement of services.

If a group of schools wants to convert as part of a UT, each school converts separately, but will set up an umbrella trust to join together. The schools can agree that the UT will appoint governors or members of the trusts in each of the schools, and set a joint vision.

 

MAT

All academies in a MAT are governed by one trust and a single board of directors.

The board of directors is responsible for decisions relating to how each academy is run, from the curriculum to staffing. The MAT can establish a local governing body for each of its academies, to which it can delegate some of its functions. The MAT remains accountable for these functions.

 

Annal Nayyar –blogs report that suggests State pension changes ‘leave academies facing £200m funding hole’

Academy schools face a £200m funding black hole as a result of changes to National Insurance contributions that form part of the government’s introduction of a single-tier state pension, an accountancy firm has warned.

UHY Hacker Young said today that the end of an NI opt-out – part of the introduction of a flat £144-a-week pension from 2016 – would typically cost secondary academies £100,000 a year, equivalent to the salaries of three teachers. Primary academies could lose out by as much as £50,000, equivalent to two posts.

The government’s reform will merge the fixed basic state pension and the contribution-based second state pension into a single payment. 

As part of the change, the opt-out that allows employers to not pay NI contributions into the second state pension for those enrolled in occupational schemes will be abolished. This will increase employer contributions, which Chancellor George Osborne has said public sector bodies will have to find from their existing budgets. The government has been warned such a policy would amount to a funding cut for services.

Analysing the impact on the almost 1,700 secondary academies and more than 1,450 primary academies, UHY Hacker Young said contributions would increase by 3.4% to 13.8% of salaries.

Annal Nayyar Pupil premium grant 2014 to 2015: conditions of grant

The pupil premium is additional funding given to schools so that they can support their disadvantaged pupils and close the attainment gap between them and their peers.

This publication covers:

•pupils recorded on the January 2014 school census as being eligible for free school meals in the last 6 years

•pupils who were eligible for the service child premium in the last 4 years

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/283193/Pupil_Premium_CoG_2014-15.pdf

Annal Nayyar Funding allocation pack: 2014 to 2015 academic year

This guide explains each element that makes up an academy’s funding allocation for the 2014 to 2015 academic year.

It includes examples and explanations to help academies understand how the EFA generates and calculates an allocation.

 

It sets out:

•where we obtain the data from

•how it is applied to an academy’s individual circumstances

•where they can look for further information about their allocation.

•changes that have been agreed and applied to the AY 2014 to 2015 funding factors

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/funding-allocation-pack-2014-to-2015-academic-year

Annal Nayyar updates on Insurance

Insurance for academies and free schools has generally been more expensive than for maintained schools, because academies and free schools do not enjoy the same economies of scale as local authorities in procuring insurance. We have decided to introduce a voluntary risk pooling scheme for academies and free schools with effect from 1st September 2014. This means you will no longer have to face higher costs for insurance than maintained schools. You will still be free to secure your own insurance should you wish to do so.

All academies and free schools will be eligible to join the new scheme. In the first year, the cost will be a flat fee of £25 per pupil for all academies and free schools. If you are already paying less for appropriate insurance, it may be possible to charge less than £25 per pupil if you decide to join the scheme. The insurance supplement of £20 per pupil being paid in 2013/14 will be withdrawn from 2014/15, because the new scheme will provide an option of insurance at a price that does not require this top-up. We will reimburse the cost of insurance above £25 per pupil under current contracts until they expire.

Annal Nayyar Education Services Grant rate

We announced in December 2012 that as a transitional protection for academies and free schools against reductions in the Education Services Grant, we would set the ESG rate for academies and free schools at £140 per pupil in the academic year 2014/15. This is now confirmed and will be reflected in the academic year 2014/15 allocations

Annal Nayyar New payment profiles

To provide more consistency across all state-funded schools and simplify financial planning from September 2014, we are revising the payment profile for academies and free schools. Currently we pay you 12% in the first month with the remainder flat profiled across the rest of the year. We are now going to profile your payments into 12 equal instalments